Work Place Safety

Yale University chemical lab safe working practices

Be sure that your fume hood works properly

Never work in lab alone

Always wear eye protection

Wear gloves when using chemicals

Keep lab clean

Eating, Drinking and smoking are not allowed in lab

Follow approved waste disposal procedures

Keep aisles and corridor’s clear

Make sure to know locations of fire extinguishers and exits

Do not carry chemicals in glass bottles in corridors and hallways without them being in a rubber bucket or cart

Write (in indelible pen) the date on new chemicals that are brought into the laboratory

Do not look directly into lasers

Make sure laser source is blocked when changing optical equipment

Do not expose skin directly to laser emission

Keep laser height away from eye level

Do not operate laser in range of flammables or combustibles

Post warnings signs and limit access when laser is in use

Take extreme precaution when touching electrical components of laser as they can cause fate shocks

Make sure to use necessary spill kits dependant of chemical type

Make sure to alert others in the case of spill  depending in spill size place warnings

In case of a person being contaminated do what is needed to save them and yourself

If person is electrocuted make sure they are not in contact with live electric’s if they are do not touch them and turn power off immediately

In case of chemical spills on body remove contaminated clothing and flush body with water

In case of fire isolate the area that is on fire and if possible shut down equipment in said area

In case of fire make sure emergency services are contacted

In case of serious injury contact Yale health services or police depending of situation

All chemical operations should be conducted in a fume hood

Each research laboratory should have at least one “vaneometer” for the purpose of measuring the air flow

The disposal of waste chemicals is to be accomplished in the following manner to comply with the Federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (1976)

Make sure chemicals are stored correctly

Not more than 10 gallons of flammable liquids may be stored outside of an approved storage cabinet in laboratories except in safety cans

Not more than 25 gallons of Class I and Class II liquids combined and not more than a total of 60 gallons of combustible liquids (Class III) shall be stored outside of a storage room

Make sure all samples are labelled with contents

Volatile chemicals should be stored in a vented storage area in an unbreakable, primary or secondary container or placed in a chemically resistant tray

Vacuum pumps used in procedures should be protected from contamination with scrubbers or filters.

Analytical instruments or other laboratory equipment generating vapours and/or aerosols during their operation should be exhausted locally

Protective clothing should be worn when dealing with high toxicity chemicals

 

Sources:

http://www.chem.yale.edu/safety/safetymanual.html

 

University chemical labs

Yale Laboratory accident

The death was discovered to be  “asphyxia due to neck compression,” caused due hair being caught in lab machinery resulting in her death this could have been avoided if she had not been in the lab on her own as if she were with others power could have been shut off,  also this would not of happened if she listened to the simple rule of keeping your hair tied up while in a lab

tert-butyllithium accident

When transferring tert-butyllithium in a syringe it ignited as one of its well know  properties is ignition with air contact result in in Sangji the one doing this to receive second- and third-degree burns across more than 40% of her body then she died two weeks later. Upon investigation it was discovered that she had not had any basic training that would of helped her understand the warnings on chemical bottles and how they are used meaning that her ignorance of safety procedures resulted in her death

 

Tsinghua University

There was a death caused by  a hydrogen tank explosion this happened when Meng Xiangjian was in the lab alone which is dangerous enough on its own, but not only was he alone in the lab but there was extremely poor safety management and due to not checking the equipment often enough this accident was caused and could have been avoided easily

 

Manchester university accident

A dangerous chemical leak occurred that resulted in the evacuation on the university due to how volatile the chemical was as it result in student injuries and upon investigation it was discovered that there were issues with how the chemicals were stored which resulted in this entire incident meaning  that it was caused by poor storage management that is required to be checked often meaning staff negligence resulted in this issue

Most of these cases fall under the health and safety legisaltion act of 1974 http://www.atl.org.uk/health-and-safety/legal-framework/health-safety-legislation.asp#1
and the The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. These cases were protected by the legislations, however the people in the incidents are the main cause of the issues due to they have not followed the legislation correctly causing said incidents for example in the tert-butyllithium accident if the ligislation was followed she would of had training before hand meaning that this accident would not of happened as she would of been sufficently prepared. and in the Yale inccident  if the legislation was follwed she would of not of been using the lab on her own with such dangerous equipment active.

Sources:

http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/2016/01/tsinghua-university-postdoc-death-accident-chinese-lab-safety

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/manchester-liverpool-university-chemical-incident-5270984

http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2011/04/13/michele-dufault-11-dies-in-sterling-chemistry-laboratory-accident/

http://www.chem.yale.edu/safety/safetymanual.html

http://www.realclearscience.com/lists/worst_lab_accidents_in_history/burning_negligence.html?state=stop

http://www.chemgeeks.com/freak-chemistry-lab-accidents.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK55862/

https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/about/governance/committees/chemicalsafety/publications/safety-in-academic-chemistry-laboratories-faculty.pdf

 

 

Yale Laboratory accident

 

There was an accident and the Yale chemical laboratory in the recent past and in with investigation the cause of death was found out, but the real question is who is at fault in terms with this issue.The death was discovered to be  “asphyxia due to neck compression,” caused due hair being caught in lab machinery resulting in her death this could have been avoided if she had not been in the lab on her own as if she were with others power could have been shut off,  also this would not of happened if she listened to the simple rule of keeping your hair tied up while in a lab this means that she did not follow simple lab protocol meaning that the fault does not lie with the lab legislation but with this student simply not following the rules properly resulting in her death, however fault can be put with the legislation as the rules may have not been may clear enough for a student to understand In conclusion based on the evidence of the safety procedures the student is mainly at fault as she did not realise about keeping her hair up she should have had someone else in the lab with there before going near any of the important machinery .

Sources: http://www.chem.yale.edu/safety/safetymanual.html

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK55862/

http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2011/04/13/michele-dufault-11-dies-in-sterling-chemistry-laboratory-accident/

 

Advertisements
Work Place Safety